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Annual Report 2013
Posted on May 27, 2014 by Kelly Izlar
The IPM Innovation Labs’s FY 2013 (October 1, 2012–September 30, 2013) annual report is now available. Click below to download the document.

http://www.oired.vt.edu/ipmcrsp/publications/annual-reports/annual-report-2013/

For users with lower bandwidth and/or with interest in only certain specific topic areas, we will split individual chapters and major sections out of the Annual Report for you to view individually. Check back in the coming weeks for a list of individual chapters and sections for download. For more information contact: rmuni@vt.edu

Table of Contents

Management Entity Message
Highlights and Achievements in 2012–2013

Regional Programs
Latin America and the Caribbean
East Africa
West Africa
South Asia
Southeast Asia
Central Asia

Global Programs
Parthenium
International Plant Diagnostic Network (IPDN)
International Plant Virus Disease Network (IPVDN)
Impact Assessment
Gender Equity, Knowledge, and Capacity Building

Associate & Buy-In Awards
Indonesia
Nepal
Bangladesh

Training and Publications
Short- and Long-Term Training
Publications

Appendices: Collaborating Institutions and Acronyms

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May 7, 2014, 10 a.m.

A WEBSITE could be the weapon of choice for farmers in the war against pest insects.

This website is called IPM Guidelines for Grains, which offers detailed information and advice for best management of destructive insect pests within Australia’s major grain crops.

It includes specific recommendations for each stage of crop development.

Developed by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Entomology team, in conjunction with collaborators in all grain growing regions of Australia, the site equips growers and advisors with the latest advice to minimise production loss.

Also designed to help implement effective, long-term pest management practices on a whole-of-farm basis, DAFF Senior Extension officer, Entomology Kate Charleston said the IPM Guidelines took a problem-solving approach as opposed to being a rigid set of management guidelines.

They draw on all available pest management tools to tailor recommendations according to crop type, growth stage and location.

“This website provides easy-to-find information that you are unlikely to find on any other pest management website,” Ms Charleston said.

“Essentially what we have done is collected all the known information about integrated pest management in grains, including some novel practices, and applied this to specific pests and crops.

“Pest pages focus on management tactics for each crop stage including ‘off season’ operations and planning, while in the crop pages we have provided risk tables to address questions such as ‘when is the crop most at risk from pests’; ‘is there something I can do to minimise pest pressure’; or ‘can certain environmental conditions make the crop more susceptible to certain pests’?”

In addition to targeted IPM recommendations, the website contains an extensive collection of supporting material that is available both on the site and via external links, as well as a series of images to help users identify individual pest species.

The website is funded by the National Invertebrate Pest Initiative (NIPI), which is supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC), and brings together scientists from state government departments, universities, farmer groups and CSIRO to address pest management issues in the Australian grains industry

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Praise for new website on African crop pest
03 April 2014 Lancaster University

The UK’s Global Food Security Champion says a Lancaster University website about the African armyworm will help to combat the pest.

Armyworm Network provides important information for farmers in Africa plagued by this devastating pest.

Professor Tim Benton said: “The new website will be a valuable resource for all farmers, governments and others whose lives have been impacted by this major pest of cereal crops in Africa. The forecasts the site provides will be particularly useful for farmers and governments to plan armyworm control activities”.

Armyworms are the caterpillar stage of a moth that migrates throughout sub-Saharan Africa. It is a serious pest of all the main cereal crops, including maize (sweetcorn), rice, millet, sorghum and wheat, as well as pasture grasses, threatening food security in the region.

A cattle farmer from South Africa, who has had armyworms on his pastures for the second year running, said: “I went out early this morning and found hundreds of them on our fields. Last year they destroyed all of our winter grazing (150 hectares), despite our best efforts to control them.

“The website of your university, thousands of kilometres away, was the only comprehensive site I could find with useful information.”

Visitors to the new website can email directly experts in African armyworm biology and control, including Professor Ken Wilson from the Lancaster Environment Centre, who developed the website.

He said, “It is fantastic to be able to launch the new website. The previous site was extremely popular, especially with farmers in Africa and with international agencies wanting to know more about this important crop pest. The new website contains so much more information and is also much easier to navigate”.

The new Armyworm Network provides information and forecasts for large- and small-scale farmers in Africa, as well as for governments, donor agencies, non-governmental organizations, journalists and other stakeholders. It replaces and improves upon its predecessor, which received more than 10,000 visitors from 30 countries during the five years it was operational.

It provides visitors with more information about the biology of this major crop pest, how it can be controlled, current research developing a new biological pesticide against it , press reports of armyworm outbreaks, publications, a live Twitter feed, and regular forecasts issued by international pest monitoring organizations.

http://www.foodsecurity.ac.uk/blog/index.php/author/ken-wilson/

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/armyworm/

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Joint venture of ADAMA Agricultural Solutions, Israeli Ministry of Education, Beer Sheva Municipality and Rashi Foundation
BY PR NEWSWIRE
MARCH 31, 2014 09:00 AM EDT

AIRPORT CITY, Israel, March 31, 2014 /PRNewswire/ –

Feeding the world in an age of diminishing resources is the focus of a unique exhibition sponsored by ADAMA Agricultural Solutions that opened last week at Carasso Science Park in Beer Sheva, Israel.
“We are delighted to assume a role in supporting the education about one of the most complex global problems of the 21st century, since our core focus combines science, technology and agriculture to create simplicity for farmers and farming,” said Rony Patishi-Chillim, SVP Business Development and Corporate communication. “Our involvement in this exhibition builds on our rich heritage in the Negev and Southern Israel, where our manufacturing plants are located and much of the innovative agriculture in Israel has been developed. The exhibition highlights our emphasis on promoting scientific education and broader understanding of the farming profession.”
Interactive exhibits allow visitors to experience the challenges that face today’s farmers as the demand for food increases while available land for planting decreases. Visitors can learn about the technological complexity of modern day agriculture, and of the global threats to plants and crops: demography, climate conditions, the shortage of water and land, soil degradation, and pests.
Scientific and technological solutions to these challenges are also explored in the exhibits, such as crop protection and treatment solutions that increase yield while simplifying the life of farmers. Innovative ways of meeting the challenges are shown, along with the global problems that can arise from the use of these technologies.
“The Park offers an introduction to the science and technology that surround us in our daily lives, through modern tools and language,” said Meir Bakshi, CEO at Carasso Science Park. “The new crop protection exhibition is an excellent example of Israeli-developed technological solutions to real-world problems. The park combines interactive education and hands-on experience through which visitors learn about the scientific solutions of an Israeli-global company facing the challenge of food.”
The crop protection exhibition is one of 10 indoor and outdoor science and technology exhibitions currently on display in the 180 thousand square foot science park. Subjects covered include light and vision, energy, communications, molecular biology, and genetics.
About ADAMA Agricultural Solutions
ADAMA Agricultural Solutions Ltd., formerly known as Makhteshim Agan Industries, is a leading global manufacturer and distributor of crop-protection solutions, and the leading off-patent provider. The Company supplies efficient solutions to farmers across the full farming value-chain, including crop-protection, novel agricultural technologies, and complementary non-crop businesses. In 2013, the Company’s revenues were over $3 billion, and it is ranked seventh in the world in the overall agro-chemicals industry. The Company is characterized by its innovation, farmer-centric approach to product development, and strict standards of environmental protection and quality control. For more information, visit us at http://www.ma-industries.com.
Contact
Anna Wood
Email: IR@ma-industries.com
Phone: +972-73-232-1131

SOURCE ADAMA Agricultural Solutions Ltd
Published March 31, 2014
Copyright © 2014 SYS-CON Media, Inc. — All Rights Reserved.
Syndicated stories and blog feeds, all rights reserved by the author.

 

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AfricanBrains

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New tools and farmer training could revolutionize pesticide management in West Africa / Studies reveal extent of risks from pesticides in the region, show that field schools can dramatically cut their use

Field schools that train farmers in alternative methods of pest control have succeeded in nearly eliminating the use of toxic pesticides by a community of cotton growers in Mali, according to a new FAO study published today by the London-based Royal Society.

The study was conducted in two areas – the Bla region of southern Mali, where FAO established a field school program in 2003, and a second area, Bougouni, where the program was not yet active.

While only 34 percent of all cotton-farmers in the area participated in the program, pesticide use on all of Bla’s cotton farms – more than 4,300 households – dropped a staggering 92 percent. FAO’s study further found that the move away from pesticide use had no negative impact on yields.

The Bougouni area, where training has not yet taken place, saw no change in pesticide use over the same eight-year period. This suggests that knowledge of alternative methods in pest control was further disseminated by program participants to other farmers in the area, underscoring the potential of farmer field schools to act as catalysts for widespread practice change.

Slashing their use of chemicals and shifting to alternative “biopesticides” like neem tree extract, growers in the Bla study group reduced their average individual production costs. (See box below for more on integrated pest management).

By refraining from applying more than 47,000 liters of toxic pesticides, the farmers saved nearly half a million dollars over the study period.

Training farmers in alternative methods of pest control proved to be three times more cost-effective than purchasing and using synthetic pesticides, according to FAO’s analysis. More than 20,000 cotton farmers have been through field schools in Mali.

“We must learn from farmers’ experience. Pragmatic, field-based and farmer-centric education can and must play a key role in making agriculture stronger and more sustainable,” said FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva. “At the end of the day, sustainable intensification will be the result of the collective action of millions of small farmers, who through their daily decisions determine the trajectory of agricultural ecosystems across the world.”

An important crop

Cotton is the principal engine of economic development in Mali, where an estimated 4 million farmers grow the high-value crop, accounting for 8-9 percent of Mali’s GDP and providing as much as 75 percent of the country’s export earnings.

Usage of pesticides in Malian cotton doubled between 1995 and 2001, but yields nonetheless fell due to increasing resistance among pests.

New tools for monitoring risks

Two related studies from the same FAO project also published today by the Royal Society – authored by Oregon State University (OSU) scientists together with researchers in West Africa and at various institutions, including FAO – reveal the extent to which pesticide use in West Africa poses risks to human health and environment.

One of these studies, conducted in 19 different communities in five West African countries, used state-of-the-art risk assessment models to provide the first detailed analysis of pesticide risks for this region. The results highlight a number of specific pesticides that pose widespread and significant threats to human health and terrestrial and aquatic wildlife throughout the region.

The study also found that farmer workers and family members, including children are routinely exposed to high concentrations of toxic pesticides such as methamidophos and dimethoate, in the crops where they work. Protective clothing that reduces pesticide exposure is largely unknown in West Africa, and reports of ill health, hospitalization and death due to chemical exposure by farm workers are not uncommon.

Lead author Paul Jepson of the Integrated Plant Protection Center at OSU states “we were shocked to find such widespread use of highly toxic organophosphate pesticides, but by carefully studying and quantifying their use, we provide a basis for much needed action by policy makers, researchers and educators.”

The authors suggest that a three-pronged approach to pesticide risk management, including monitoring systems to enable science-based decision-making, functional regulatory systems and effective farmer education programs.

The third study from the FAO project reports on the first use in the region of passive sampling devices (PSDs), developed by Oregon State University, which are technologically simple tools that sequester and concentrate a wide variety of pesticides and other chemicals found in the environment. The tool is a major advancement for monitoring pollution in remote areas of less developed regions.

PSD samples were deployed and then simultaneously analyzed in African and U.S. laboratories, as a proof of this concept. This opens the possibility for widespread analysis of pesticides in West African surface waters.

All three papers appearing today in the Royal Society journal were co-financed by a six-country regional project, financed by the Global Environmental Facility (GEF) through the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and executed by FAO, Reducing Dependence on Persistent Organic Pollutants and other Agro-Chemicals in the Senegal and Niger River Basins through Integrated Production, Pest and Pollution Management.

According to William Settle, who coordinates the FAO project in Mali: “This effort has facilitated a partnership between scientists around the globe and West African counterparts – the results are striking, and have the potential to transform the conversation about pesticide risks and sustainable crop management in this ecologically fragile region.”

FAO undertakes its work on pesticide management in West Africa through close working partnerships with governments in the region as well as organizations such as the CERES Locustox Laboratory and ENDA-Pronat group in Senegal and Oregon State University’s Integrated Plant Protection Center.

Financing for the FAO programme been provided by the European Union, the Government of the Netherlands, and a GEF/UNEP grant.

Farmer Field Schools and integrated pest management

FAO’s West African Regional Integrated Production and Pest Management Programme (IPPM), established in 2001, is currently active in seven countries in West Africa: Benin, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal. Approximately 30 countries in sub-Saharan Africa have employed a field-school approach and 90 countries world-wide.

Using a “farmer field school” (FSS) approach, the program engages with farming communities to introduce discovery-based methods for field testing, adapting, and then adopting improved farming practices.

IPPM consists of environmental-friendly approaches to tackling pest problems, such as introducing beneficial predator insects, using natural biopesticides, or adopting cropping practices that ensure that plants are healthy and resistant when pest attacks are mostly likely to occur.

In most places, the approach is relatively simple to adopt using locally available materials. It relies heavily on prevention, and on farmers prioritizing early detection of problems and knowing their response options.

To date the FAO-IPPM program has trained approximately 180,000 farmers in West Africa and more than 2,000 trainers from government extension, cotton companies, farmer organizations and NGOs. The programme is expanding to new countries in the region.

http://africanbrains.net/2014/02/19/new-tools-farmer-training-revolutionize-pesticide-management-west-africa/

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Ladybug

Looking to brush up on your pest management skills? Register now to ensure your spot at this pioneering workshop designed to serve specialty crop, field crop and landscape professionals.

Michigan State University Extension is pleased to announce that the third annual Integrated Pest Management Academy will be held Feb. 18-19, 2014, at the Okemos Conference Center in Okemos, Mich., located just outside of East Lansing, Mich. The 2014 Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Academy is a two-day workshop packed full of information to help you improve your IPM practices on farm and take advantage of all the great resources MSU has to offer.

The presenters at this program include a number of MSU’s best and brightest research and Extension faculty, offering a rare opportunity to hear from experts working in a variety of disciplines and cropping systems at a single event. The first day of the program will cover fundamental topics including: IPM strategies for disease and insect control; promoting and protecting pollinators; alternative weed control strategies; pesticide basics; the impacts of weather on pesticides; invasive pests; and IPM resources from MSU. On the second day of the workshop, participants opt into two, half-day sessions focused on the topic of their choice. This year, the day two sessions include the following options.

Morning sessions

Soil health: What is it, Why is it Important, and How Can it be Managed?
Soil is one of the most important, but often the ignored components of successful plant production. Understanding the importance of soil management and how soil interacts with nutrients, water and pesticides will be explored during this session. Attendees are encouraged to bring soil test results to get a personal recommendation for their site and crops. This a cross commodity session, everyone’s welcome.

Landscape Design and IPM: Getting it Right from the Start
Many landscape plant problems are rooted in poor design or poor plant selection. This session will feature a discussion on landscape design, placement and selection of ornament plants and their implications when dealing with pest management in landscapes. This session may be of interest to landscape professionals or backyard enthusiasts.

Stewardship of Pesticides in Michigan Field Crops
Farmers use many tools to manage weeds, insects and diseases in their cropping system. Still, chemical controls are often favored for their ability to provide efficient and effective crop protection. This session will offer an overview of the many pesticide options available to field crop producers, discuss their modes of action and highlight management strategies that can be used to limit the development of pesticide resistance as well as practices that can be used to manage pest populations that already exhibit resistance.

Hops: Getting Started
The morning hop session will cover an introduction to hops, soils and site selection, understanding soil and tissue testing, variety selection, trellising, irrigation and establishment costs.

Afternoon sessions

Hop Management
The afternoon hop session will cover planting and training hops, fertilizer and nutrient requirements, common insect mite and disease problems, scouting for insects and diseases, weed management, and harvesting and processing hops.

Ecologically Based Fruit Pest Management
Growing fruit can be an input-intensive, challenging endeavor. Session participants will learn about ecologically sound preventative pest actions, pest management approaches, and horticultural practices that can help lessen the challenge of growing fruit.

Managing Pests in Diverse Vegetable Rotations
Michigan growers produce a wide diversity of vegetables at many different scales, which are challenged by a sometimes overwhelming diversity of insect, disease and weed pests. This session aims to introduce conventional and organic growers to an integrated set of control tactics—including cultural, chemical, mechanical and biological approaches—that can be used to manage pests in an economically and environmentally sound way.

Solving the Puzzle: IPM Planning and Implementation for Real-world Field Crops Systems
Integrated pest management makes sense on paper, but how do you fit this broad philosophy into a real-world cropping system? In this session we will discuss how to develop a farm IPM plan that encourages pest management decisions that focus on maintaining efficiency and maximizing profitability. In addition, a panel of farmers will share with participants how they have successfully incorporated IPM principles into their farm plans.

Emerging Pest Problems of Michigan Landscapes 
New or invasive pests can cause significant economic and ecological damage. This session will review current and potential pest problems to Michigan landscapes such as oak wilt, hemlock woolly adelgid, thousand canker disease, Asian longhorn beetle and more.

Registration

The cost of this event is $225. Please note that snacks, lunch and parking are included. Participants also receive a notebook with program material and a complimentary IPM-related MSU bulletin. Michigan pesticide recertification credits will be available; the exact number will be based on session selection, but participants can expect at least six credits (private or commercial core available).

For more information on the program, a full agenda or registration, visit http://bit.ly/ipm-academy14. To register by phone, contact Betsy Braid at braidbet@msu.edu or 517-884-7081.

This program was developed with support from the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture — National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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MSU Extension is now offering Integrated Pest Management Academy Online, a series of online prerecorded webinars available to the public. Commercial and private core pesticide recertification credits are available for Michigan applicators. No registration or fees are required.

This series of integrated pest management on-demand webinars have been created to help Michigan growers identify pest management resources and understand IPM basics. Viewers can earn up to four pesticide recertification credits.

To access the webinars go to http://bit.ly/ipmwebinars. Accommodations for people with disabilities may be requested by contacting Erin Lizotte at taylo548@msu.edu.

The following webinars are currently available for viewing:

Introduction to Integrated Pest Management: Learn about the history of pest management, the evolution of IPM and the tenets that define implementation in the field.

Integrated Pest Management Resources: Learn about IPM resources available from Michigan State University and MSU Extension.

Entomology 101: In this compact session on insects, learn the vocabulary to help you properly identify insects and better understand the role of insects in the world.

Plant Pathology 101: This introductory webinar covers the basics of plant pathogens and introduces viewers to some popular control methods.

Soil Science 101: This webinar highlights the importance of soil characteristics and their potential impacts on agricultural producers.

Plant Science 101: Learn the basics of plant anatomy and physiology — particularly handy for those who struggle with weed identification.

Pesticides 101: An introduction to mode of action, pesticide resistance and factors that impact efficacy.

Insect Scouting in Fruit Crops: This primer offers a fruit-specific module on how insect scouting occurs in the real world.

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