Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Monitoring’ Category

fresh fruit logoffp

U.K.: Drones to tackle fruit fly spread on soft fruit farms – FreshFruitPortal.com

April 10 , 2017

Scientists at Scotland’s University of Aberdeen are using drone technology to create a new monitoring system for the fruit fly Drosophila suzukii. 

The drones will detect the pests much earlier than traditional methods by flying over “sticky traps” where the fruit fly can be identified from the air. Imaging capturing and processing systems will be developed to automatically differentiate fruit flies from other pests.

Also known as Spotted Wing Drosophila, the fruit fly has become a serious threat to soft fruit growers since arriving in the U.K. from Europe in 2012. Over the last few years it has affected several crops including strawberries, raspberries and grapes.

The three-year drone project aims to hone in on early detection, altering growers so they can take swift action to prevent crop damage, and improve upon the current monitoring methods which are time-consuming and costly.

Dr David Green, from the University of Aberdeen, explains how the Drosophila suzukii spreads rapidly and early detection is key to containing the devastating pest which has been found on farms in England’s key soft fruit growing regions in the south-east and as far north as Dundee, Scotland.

“One of the main challenges of our work will be developing a method that automatically identifies the presence of the fly among other pests. Our Dutch partners at the University of Wageningen are specialists in image processing, and our aim is to develop an image-capturing and processing system that can recognise the fly and carry out an automatic count in order to determine the density of the infestation.

“Ultimately, our goal is to develop a system which has real value for soft fruit growers – many of whom operate on tight margins – that can help protect their livelihoods.”

The project is funded by the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra), also involves Dr Johannes Fahrentrapp at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Switzerland and Dr Lammert Kooistra the University of Wageningen in the Netherlands.

Photo: http://www.shutterstock.com

www.freshfruitportal.com

Read Full Post »

As part of its mass extension activities for 2016, Plantwise Ghana rolled out a four-week  prevalent in the project’s five intervention regions in Ghana. The campaign, which took place between September and October 2016, involved five radio stations noted for […]

via Plantwise Ghana Educates Farmers on Major Crop Pest and Diseases — The Plantwise Blog

Read Full Post »

FreshPlaza

http://www.freshplaza.com/article/168323/Argentina-Tool-to-control-potato-pests-and-diseases

Argentina: Tool to control potato pests and diseases

Growing potatoes increases the pressure of pests and diseases, which usually results in the intensive use of plant protection products. To avoid unnecessary applications, a team of specialists from INTA’s Balcarce Integrated Unit and the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the National University of Mar del Plata, designed a tool to help producers make decisions. The tool, which is called the SGC Calidad Papa (SGC Quality Potato), is a quality management system that aims at maintaining the potato crop’s health, and was tested in fields with high levels of production.

Gladys Clemente, who is a professor of Phytopathology at the FCA-UNMdP and a researcher at the Balcarce Integrated Unit said: “Usually, producers make fungicide applications based on preset calendar schemes to manage diseases.”

The potato is an inten! sive crop that “is grown in large areas and that requires intensive applications to prevent the development of diseases that can cause major losses, such as potato blight,” Clemente said.

“Decision-making, tailored to the crops real needs, reduces potato production costs by reducing the number of fungicide applications, protects the environment, and ensures producers obtain safe food,” Clemente argued.

According to FAO, the potato is the third biggest food crop, after rice, and wheat. In fact, it occupies a prominent place in the diet of the Argentinians, who consume an average of nearly 60 kilos of potatoes per year.

According to Clemente, the SGC Calidad Papa system will allow producers to manage the pests and diseases that affect the crop at any time of the production cycle in an appropriate and correct manner. “This tool allows producers to make decisions regarding the application of phytosanitary products based on technical-agronomic knowledge acquired from the permanent monitoring of the crops, in combination with risk forecasts, and laboratory diagnosis,” she said.

“Apart form field monitorings and laboratory diagnosis, the quality management system includes a record of meteorologic! al variables in situ to calculate the risk of diseases,” Clemente said. “By using a very clear graph, which is similar to a stop light, we send reports to the producers or consultant warning them about the current possibility of disease development and a forecast for the next five days,” she added.

This information is reported through several weekly newsletters and helps producers identify the right time to make the applications. “Our goal is to provide this information to other potato producing regions of the country. To do this, we are working on the creation of networks with professionals from other INTA units and Agronomy faculties,” the specialist said.

Due to its impact, this project received $35,000 from the Innovar Awards in the Applied Research category. Specialists Marcelo Atilio Huarte, Maria Cecilia Bedogni, Andrea Eugenia Salvalaggio, Marino Marcelo Puricelli, Sebastian Emilio Boracci, and Veronica Elizabeth Crovo also participated in the research.

Recently, SGC Calidad Papa was presented at the Hackaton Agro held in Tandil, on December 3 and 4. The project was also invited to participate in the First Symposium on Bioeconomics of the South Central Pampeana Region, to be held in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires.

Source: infocampo.com.ar

Publication date: 12/16/2016

From PestNet

Grahame Jackson
24 Alt street
Queens Park
NSW 2022
Australia

Read Full Post »

FreshPlaza

http://www.freshplaza.com/article/168323/Argentina-Tool-to-control-potato-pests-and-diseases

Growing potatoes increases the pressure of pests and diseases, which usually results in the intensive use of plant protection products. To avoid unnecessary applications, a team of specialists from INTA’s Balcarce Integrated Unit and the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences of the National University of Mar del Plata, designed a tool to help producers make decisions. The tool, which is called the SGC Calidad Papa (SGC Quality Potato), is a quality management system that aims at maintaining the potato crop’s health, and was tested in fields with high levels of production.
Gladys Clemente, who is a professor of Phytopathology at the FCA-UNMdP and a researcher at the Balcarce Integrated Unit said: “Usually, producers make fungicide applications based on preset calendar schemes to manage diseases.”
The potato is an intensive crop that “is grown in large areas and that requires intensive applications to prevent the development of diseases that can cause major losses, such as potato blight,” Clemente said.
“Decision-making, tailored to the crops real needs, reduces potato production costs by reducing the number of fungicide applications, protects the environment, and ensures producers obtain safe food,” Clemente argued.
According to FAO, the potato is the third biggest food crop, after rice, and wheat. In fact, it occupies a prominent place in the diet of the Argentinians, who consume an average of nearly 60 kilos of potatoes per year.
According to Clemente, the SGC Calidad Papa system will allow producers to manage the pests and diseases that affect the crop at any time of the production cycle in an appropriate and correct manner. “This tool allows producers to make decisions regarding the application of phytosanitary products based on technical-agronomic knowledge acquired from the permanent monitoring of the crops, in combination with risk forecasts, and laboratory diagnosis,” she said.
“Apart form field monitorings and laboratory diagnosis, the quality management system includes a record of meteorological variables in situ to calculate the risk of diseases,” Clemente said. “By using a very clear graph, which is similar to a stop light, we send reports to the producers or consultant warning them about the current possibility of disease development and a forecast for the next five days,” she added.
This information is reported through several weekly newsletters and helps producers identify the right time to make the applications. “Our goal is to provide this information to other potato producing regions of the country. To do this, we are working on the creation of networks with professionals from other INTA units and Agronomy faculties,” the specialist said.
Due to its impact, this project received $35,000 from the Innovar Awards in the Applied Research category. Specialists Marcelo Atilio Huarte, Maria Cecilia Bedogni, Andrea Eugenia Salvalaggio, Marino Marcelo Puricelli, Sebastian Emilio Boracci, and Veronica Elizabeth Crovo also participated in the research.
Recently, SGC Calidad Papa was presented at the Hackaton Agro held in Tandil, on December 3 and 4. The project was also invited to participate in the First Symposium on Bioeconomics of the South Central Pampeana Region, to be held in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires.
Source: infocampo.com.ar

 

Publication date: 12/16/2016

Read Full Post »

http://www.oired.vt.edu/ipmil/ipm-il-finds-sterile-soil-rice-damaging-nematode-cambodia/#more-6474

When Jon Eisenback, professor of plant nematology at Virginia Tech’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, conducted nematode surveys on vegetables and rice in Cambodia this past August, one of the most surprising things he encountered in the vegetable fields was, in a word, nothing.

“One of the biggest finds from that trip was almost completely sterile soil,” Eisenback said of the surveys he and postdoctoral associate Paulo Viera conducted in vegetable farms near Siem Reap.

They visited farms growing cucumbers, sweet melons, eggplants, tomatoes, and cantaloupes to assess whether any of them were suffering from nematode invasions, but they found that all the crops were grown under plastic with drip irrigation. They had been covered with so many pesticides that there was nearly nothing living – the soil was essentially ruined.

cambodia-survey-768x512

Jon Eisenback, second from right, professor of plant nematology at Virginia Tech’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, testing soil in the fields of Cambodia with postdoctoral associate Paulo Viera, second from left.

Plant parasitic nematodes are microscopic roundworms that cause significant damage to many crops. In Cambodia, a country with nearly half of its labor force in agriculture, nematodes can create big problems for food production.

To control the pest, Eisenback and Viera traveled to Cambodia to survey nematodes for two IPM Innovation Lab Projects: Rice IPM for Cambodia and Vegetable crops and mango IPM in Asia.

Because of our program’s focus on biocontrol and biopesticides to alleviate agricultural pest problems, Eisenback said that the vegetable IPM project would increase chances that vegetable farmers in Cambodia would stop the soil-killing overuse of pesticides.

After surveying the vegetable fields in the north, Eisenback and Viera traveled to the south of the country to conduct nematode surveys on rice. Given the dearth of scientific literature published on nematodes in Cambodia relating to rice, Eisenback and Viera weren’t sure what to expect. However, they found that the rice fields they surveyed showed a significant loss of production caused by the rice root nematode.

“Every root we looked at had lesions,” Eisenback said. The culprit was a parasitic nematode called Hirschmanniella mucronata. “Rice roots should be creamy white. These were speckled with brown and orange lesions.”

Eisenback expects that these nematodes could cause a 20 to 30 percent crop loss of rice in affected fields.

The next step is field demonstrations; to undertake them, half the fields should be treated with nematicide to measure the effect. Eisenback also said he hopes to continue the survey to see what other nematodes are there.

“I would suspect that there are other fields with other nematode problems.”

As for the vegetable fields with the sterile soil near Siem Reap, Eisenback offered a recommendation for them as well: Don’t use so many toxic pesticides.

With IPM IL’s projects up and running in the region, that should soon become less of a problem.

Read Full Post »

  • Fall armyworms in soybeans can be most economically controlled with a pyrethroid insecticide. Armyworms are a pest that can be controlled at two to three dollars per acre.
University of Tennessee Extension

Fall armyworms have been a problem for most Alabama farmers in pastures and hayfields during the summer months. Alabama Extension entomologists have spotted fall armyworms in soybean fields in north Alabama.

Dr. Ron Smith said armyworm numbers statewide are higher than they have been in a very long time.

“The biggest issue for farmers is detecting the armyworms in time to treat pastures and hayfields, especially in central Alabama,” Smith said. “In north Alabama, the armyworms are in soybean fields. While some of the worms may have moved from a pasture to the soybeans, there are armyworm eggs being laid in soybean fields.”

Movement and scouting

Smith said earlier in the season, the armyworms move from a ravaged pasture to a field of tender soybeans. But now, worms are going directly to the soybean plants to deposit their eggs. There are two strains of armyworms, one prefers grasses and soybeans the other prefers cotton. In this case, the armyworms in north Alabama are the grass-eating strain.

About three weeks ago fall armyworms were the primary caterpillar species leading farmers to spray in some north Alabama soybean fields.

Now in the Tennessee Valley and other parts of the state, the fall armyworm is a member of a complex of foliage feeding caterpillars infesting soybeans that include green cloverworms, soybean loopers, pod worms (cotton bollworm), a few yellow striped armyworms and velvetbean caterpillars. Pod worms are generally feared for their bloom and pod feeding, but early in August they were observed feeding on foliage as well as blooms in double-cropped soybeans.

Alabama Cooperative Extension System conservation crop specialist Dr. Dennis Delaney said soybeans would offer tender vegetation, which is what armyworms feed on in pastures.

“Just like in pastures, armyworms can eat most of the soybean plant,” Delaney said. “The armyworms tend to eat the leaves and leave the tougher part of the plant. They also often move from grass weeds in soybean fields to soybean plants when the grass is eaten up, or killed by herbicides.”

Delaney said their movement from plant to plant is quick, and an infested field can be seriously damaged in a short amount of time. After bloom, the threshold for lower leaf loss is 20 percent or less.

Caterpillar thresholds

Dr. Kathy Flanders, an Alabama Extension entomologist, said she recommends treatments in pastures when there are more than two caterpillars per square foot. One way to determine the number of caterpillars in a field is to physically look for them, but sometimes finding them is difficult.

In the field, Smith said the soybean threshold is normally six to eight caterpillars per row foot. The sweep net threshold for fall armyworms is 1.5 medium to large size caterpillars per sweep, and a foliage loss potential of more than 20 percent in soybeans in the reproductive stage.

Life Cycle and treatment

It takes about 30 days for a female armyworm to develop into a mature, egg-laying worm. The length of this cycle coincides with reports of armyworms in the state. Some of the first armyworm reports were in late June. Producers are now seeing a recurrence of armyworm issues they thought were taken care of earlier in the summer.

“Fall armyworms in soybeans can be most economically controlled with a pyrethroid insecticide at a mid-label rate,” Smith said. “Armyworms are a pest that can thankfully be controlled at a rate of two to three dollars per acre.”

Alabama Cooperative Extension System entomologists have been watching soybean looper numbers rise for several weeks. The major outbreak entomologists warned against earlier in the summer is happening in soybean fields in south and central Alabama.

Loopers increasing

Soybean loopers are also increasing in number in many north Alabama soybean fields. These are the key species triggering treatments during the third week of August in some fields in the Tennessee Valley for the complex of foliage feeding and pod feeding worms infesting double-cropped soybeans. The most recent year in which the soybean looper was a serious pest of north Alabama soybeans was 2012 when treatments were initiated the first week of September.

Soybean looper

Extension researchers have pest traps scattered at locations throughout the state. High soybean looper trap counts in July gave entomologists reason to believe the looper numbers would be higher than-average in early August.

Reed and Smith are encouraging farmers to diligently scout soybean fields.

“The occurrence of soybean loopers is widespread in soybean fields in south and central Alabama at this time,” Smith said. “With widespread pest pressure, if a grower does not have a commercial scout, it is important to actively look for soybean loopers themselves.”

Adding insecticides to fungicide

Farmers in the Gulf Coast area of Alabama began adding insecticides to their fungicide sprays for some fields during the first half of August to slow the increase in soybean looper numbers.

Soybean looper larvae feed primarily on foliage. They will normally start feeding in the lower half of the plant canopy and move upward over time. Reed said scouts should try get their sweep nets into the lower half of the canopy if possible to get a more accurate estimate of soybean looper numbers. Soybean loopers are more difficult to dislodge from soybeans than other foliage feeding caterpillars.

“Early on, farmers will see leaves with a window pane effect,” Reed said. “The very small soybean looper larvae eat only the green portion of the leaf leaving behind the transparent cuticle layer. As larvae mature, they become more aggressive feeders and once soybean loopers begin feeding on the upper canopy, they can soon consume more than 50 percent of the foliage when numbers are high.”

Smith said soybean loopers are the most expensive pest to control. While there is more than one option, there are a limited number of control options available for soybean loopers—ranging from less than $10 per acre to nearly $20 per acre. Intrepid, Intrepid Edge, Belt, Besiege, Prevathon and Steward are the only four products available to farmers for soybean looper control.

Read Full Post »

Rural banner_background-data

Drones could be the answer to early disease detection in banana crops

 Updated 18 Jul 2016, 12:10am

A researcher is looking into the possibility of using remote sensing to detect diseases in banana crops.

University of New England PhD candidate Aaron Aeberli said different sensor systems could be attached to satellites or drones.

“Remote sensing records the interaction of different objects to different levels of electromagnetic radiation systems,” he said.

Mr Aeberli said the technology was already being used in other crops such as sugar cane, wheat, cotton and peanuts.

“A lot of the broadfield cropping systems have used them overseas to find out yield and other predictions like that,” he said.

“There’s potential to find out the health of the different plants, and if we can work on it enough, the potential to detect disease occurrence.”

Diseases could be detected early through the application of thermal imaging.

“It uses a different part of the spectrum to monitor the warmth or heat of the object, and a lot of plants, their function is impaired by disease, particularly the heat or thermal regulation,” Mr Aeberli said.

“There is potential to notice changes in the leaf temperature if the plant is no longer able to function normally.

“Some of the bigger crops like wheat, they use it a fair amount and it does save them time. It can help with production and management systems.”

Technology to be trialled in Queensland

Mr Aeberli is hoping to develop the technology further for the banana industry.

 

He is collaborating with the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and Horticulture Innovation Australia on upcoming trials in far north Queensland.

“We’re looking to take some satellite imagery and we’ll go into the field and try and evaluate this satellite imagery, so that the field conditions reflect what we’ve been taking from the satellites,” he said.

“We’re also looking at the use of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) for a similar system.”

There could be potential for banana growers to one day monitor the health of their own crops by drones.

“It’s early days so we need to work out what systems work,” Mr Aeberli said.

“I wouldn’t necessarily go out and tell everyone to buy a drone at this point in time, but once a valid system that works has been set up, there’s potential for that.”

Topics: bananas, agricultural-crops, murwillumbah-2484, cairns-4870, bundaberg-4670, coffs-harbour-2450

First posted 17 Jul 2016, 8:58pm

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »