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  • International Conference on Emerging Trends in Integrated Pest Management for Quality Food Production
  • 25-27 July 2017
  • The Waterfront Hotel, Kuching, Malaysia

To register go  to:

https://www.cvent.com/events/international-conference-on-emerging-trends-in-integrated-pest-and-disease-management-for-quality-fo/registration-3a4013628d8947bdbd69c34bc96f2a35.aspx?fqp=true

 

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Asian-Pacific WS meeting

Dear colleagues and friends,

On behalf of the organizing committee, it is my pleasure and great honor to invite you to attend the 26th Asian-Pacific Weed Science Society Conference (APWSS 2017) Kyoto, to be held on  (refer to http://www.c-linkage.co.jp/apwss2017/). The theme of the conference is “Weed Science for People, Agriculture, and Nature.”

Weed science is a comprehensive research area that covers ecology, biology and chemistry related to weed control and management. Weed science is nowadays an advanced science that is closely linked to human societies. We should use interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to address future weed science and management. I assure you that attending the 26th APWSS conference provides an excellent opportunity to meet experts in weed science and the respective fields and learn to apply your new-found knowledge when you return home.

The host city, Kyoto, is the ancient capital of Japan and is recognized worldwide as the country’s historical, cultural and spiritual heart. The city offers you numerous cultural and unique experiences with its countless shrines, temples, and architectural masterpieces including 17 UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Sites. Mid-September is one of the best times to visit Kyoto. We suggest you to take a nice walk and to enjoy the streets and local sightseeing spots before and after attending the conference.

We look forward to welcoming you in Kyoto, September 2017!

Dr. Hiroshi Matsumoto

Chairperson, the 26th Asian-Pacific Weed Science Society Conference (APWSS2017)

President, Asian-Pacific Weed Science Society

Professor, University of Tsukuba

*************************************************

The deadline of call for papers is on 31 May 2017.

(refer to http://www.c-linkage.co.jp/apwss2017/papers.html)

Other important links are as follows:

Registration details   http://www.c-linkage.co.jp/apwss2017/registration.html

Program    http://www.c-linkage.co.jp/apwss2017/programme.html

Secretariat e-mail: apwss2017@c-linkage.co.jp

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BCPC Congress 2017

BCPC 2017

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fresh plaza logo

Red beetle threatens the global production of dates and coconuts

A little red beetle that devastates palm is rapidly spreading around the
world and threatens the production of dates and coconuts, unless we manage to stop its advance.
Scientists, experts in pest control, agricultural ministers and representatives of farmers participating in a three-day meeting that began today at the headquarters of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome will discuss and define a plan for international action to stop the spread of the red palm weevil. The pest attacks the date palms and coconut trees, as well as ornamental palms found in many European cities.
Over the past three decades, the weevil has spread rapidly through the Middle East and North Africa, affecting almost the entire region. It has already been detected in more than 60 countries including France, Greece, Italy, Spain and parts of the Caribbean and Central America.
“The red palm weevil is the most dangerous threat to date palms,” stated the Deputy Director General of FAO and Regional Representative for the Middle East and North Africa, Abdessalam Ould Ahmed, at the meeting’s opening session. “Insufficient implementation of phytosanitary standards, the lack of an effective preventive strategy, and inadequate monitoring of response measures explain the failure to stop the plague so far,” he added.
The FAO, in collaboration with the International Center for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM), organized the Scientific Consultation and High Level Meeting on the red palm weevil.
“The Mediterranean area is home to a rich biodiversity of plant species that must be protected because of social, economic, and environmental reasons. Therefore, it’s essential to have a sustainable strategy to protect the entire region from phytosanitary threats, “said Cosimo Lacirignola, the Secretary General of CIHEAM.
An invisible killer 
The red palm weevil causes millions of dollars in economic damage annually, either by the loss of production or the costs of combating the plague. Each year, the Gulf countries and the Middle East lose 8 million US dollars removing heavily infested trees. The combined cost of fighting the plague, removing and replacing infested palms, and loss of profits caused by it in Italy, Spain, and France amounted to nearly 90 million euro in 2013. This cost is expected to increase to 200 million euro by 2023 if the area doesn’t apply a strict containment program.
Part of the problem is that the red palm weevil is extremely difficult to detect in the early stages of an infestation, as there are very few visible external signs that the pest has taken over a tree: the insects remain hidden from view for almost 80 percent of their lifecycle. When it comes to tall palm species, the infestation is even more difficult to detect as the tree top is very high, and once the pest has been installed, it is too late to save them.
Oases threatened 
Palm trees are an important resource for many communities in the Middle East and North Africa. The dates have been a staple food for centuries there, and they are now an important cash crop, as the area produces more than seven million tons of this product. In total, there are currently about 100 million date palms, 60 percent of which are in Arab countries. The red palm weevil attacks young and soft trees, which are no more than 20 years old. About half of the 100 million palms match this criteria and are therefore vulnerable.
Palm trees are also vital to maintain the culture system of oases, which allow other productive trees and plants to grow under the palm’s canopy. If the pest is not stopped, the production will be strongly affected, which could lead to an economic migration of communities living in the urban oases.
High-tech solutions 
Scientific Consultation, and High Level Meetings on the red palm weevil, focus on containing the spread of the pest. The attendees will share the progress in integrated pest control, such as the selective and reduced use of insecticides and bio-pesticides, the use of highly sensitive and low cost microphones that can detect the larvae feeding inside the trees, pheromone-based traps, drones, remote sensing, and sniffer dogs. On Friday’s session, government representatives will discuss and adopt a multi-disciplinary and multi-regional strategy that includes effective implementation of cross-border phytosanitary standards.
Source: elmundo.cr

Publication date: 4/3/2017

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FAO – News Article: First global push to stop Red Palm Weevil wiping out palms

Home > Media > News Article

First global push to stop Red Palm Weevil wiping out palms

Experts set to greenlight an action plan to stop the spread of the destructive beetle

Photo: ©FAO/Daniel Beaumont

Pest-control measures to stop the Red Palm Weevil in Tunisia

29 March 2017, Rome – A small red weevil that destroys palm trees has rapidly expanded its global spread and threatens date and coconut production if its advance is not stopped.

Scientists, pest control experts, agricultural ministers and farmer representatives have begun a three-day meeting at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in Rome to debate and define an international action plan to stop the spread of the Red Palm Weevil. The pest attacks date- and coconut-producing palms, as well as ornamental palms found in many European cities.

Over the last three decades the weevil has spread rapidly through the Middle East and North Africa, affecting almost every country in the region. In total it has now been detected in more than 60 countries including France, Greece, Italy, Spain and parts of the Caribbean and Central America.

“The Red Palm Weevil represents the most dangerous threat to date palm,” FAO Assistant Director-General and Regional Representative for Near East and North Africa, Mr. Abdessalam Ould Ahmed, told attendees at the opening session. “Insufficient implementation of phytosanitary standards, lack of an effective preventive strategy and insufficient monitoring of response measures explain the failure in containing the pest so far.”

The Scientific Consultation and High-Level Meeting on Red Palm Weevil is hosted by FAO in collaboration with the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies (CIHEAM). “The Mediterranean area harbours a vast biodiversity of plant species that must be protected for social, economic and environmental reasons. A sustainable protection strategy is therefore more essential than ever to protect the whole region from phytosanitary threats,” said Cosimo Lacirignola, Secretary-General of CIHEAM.

An invisible killer

The weevil causes economic losses in the millions of dollars annually, whether through lost production or pest-control costs. In Gulf countries and the Middle East, $8 million is lost each year through removal of severely-infested trees alone. In Italy, Spain and France, the combined cost of pest management, eradication and replacement of infested palms, and loss of benefits was around €90 million by 2013. This cost is forecast to increase to €200 million by 2023 if a rigorous containment program is not in place.

Part of the problem is that the Red Palm Weevil is extremely difficult to detect in the early stages of an infestation because there are few externally-visible signs that the pest has taken over a tree: around 80 percent of the pest’s life-cycle is hidden from view. For extremely tall species, an infestation in the crown of the tree is even harder to detect. Once an infestation has taken hold it is too late to save the tree.

Oasis communities at risk

Palm trees are an important resource for many communities in the Middle East and North Africa. Dates have been a basic food staple for centuries, and are now an important economic crop. More than seven million tonnes of dates are produced annually. In total, around 100 million date palm trees are cultivated today, 60 percent of them in Arab countries. The Red Palm Weevil attacks young, soft trees that are less than 20 years old. Around half of the 100 million date palm trees fit this criteria and are therefore vulnerable.

The trees are also vital to maintaining the oasis cultivation system, whereby other productive trees and plants can grow under the palms’ canopy. If the Red Palm Weevil is not stopped, production will be heavily impacted which could trigger economic migration from oases communities to urban areas.

High-tech solutions

The Scientific Consultation and High-Level Meeting on Red Palm Weevil focuses on containing the pest’s spread. Advances in integrated pest control will be shared such as the targeted and reduced use of insecticides and bio-pesticides, low-cost, highly-sensitive microphones that can detect larvae feeding inside a tree, pheromone-based traps, drones, remote-sensing, and sniffer dogs. During the high-level session on Friday government representatives are expected to discuss and adopt a multi-disciplinary and multi-regional strategy that includes effective implementation of cross-border phytosanitary standards.

 

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For Conference details see:  http://www.acpp2017.org

korea-170220_%ec%98%a8%eb%9d%bc%ec%9d%b8%eb%b2%a0%eb%84%88-%ec%99%84%eb%a3%8c_out

Invitation

On behalf of the Asian Conference on Plant Pathology 2017 (ACPP 2017) organizing committee, we would like to invite you to attend the ACPP 2017, which will be held at International Convention Center in Jeju, South Korea, from September 13 to 16, 2017.

Asia is the most populous continent. Over 60% of human population live in this continent and the population of Asian will be increased for the next tens of years. Now we are faced with lots of threats, such as climate changes, epidemic of plant diseases, and environmental pollutions, to disturb sustainable supply of foods and natural resources for diverse industries. Considering it, plant disease is a significant threat to food security for many nations. It is therefore imperative to devise the novel and stable control strategies for plant disease, which requires understanding of plant pathogens and interaction between host and pathogen. Asian Conference of Plant Pathology (ACPP) has been the forum to foster collaboration among scientists around the world, especially Asia. Not surprisingly, much progress has taken place in a wide range of research topics on the biology, genomics, host-pathogen interactions, resistance, and disease management. To share the recent advancement in scientific researches and to broaden our understanding of plant diseases, we host the 6th ACPP in beautiful island of South Korea, Jeju. We cordially invite you to this exciting meeting held in the UNESCO Heritage and the New 7 Wonders of Nature!

The meeting promises to be an exciting venue to update you on most topics of plant pathology, from diagnosis to biotechnology. It is anticipated that over 700 participants will attend the conference, providing a unique opportunity to promote scientific collaboration. Welcome reception and conference dinner will also be held during the conference.

Please register for the meeting and submit your abstract for presentation or for poster. The various deadlines for the meeting will be posted on the 6th ACPP website at http://acpp2017.org.

The conference will start on Wednesday, September 13, 2017. Please plant to arrive in International Convention Center the afternoon or evening of Tuesday, September 12, 2017. Please let us know if you need any further assistance for your travel arrangements and we will look forward to seeing you in Jeju, South Korea.

Heung-Tae Kim

Yong-Hwan Lee

Chairperson

President

Conference Organizing Committee of the ACPP 2017

The Korean Society of Plant Pathology

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mersie

Dr. Wondi Mersie of Virginia State University, PI of the IPM Innovation Lab’s “Biological control of the invasive weed Parthenium hysterophorus in East Africa” project.

Feed the Future IPM Innovation Lab and Invasive Weed Species

The IPM Innovation Lab presented two papers at the “International Conference on Biodiversity, Climate Change Assessment and Impacts on Livelihood” in Kathmandu, Nepal. Dr. R. Muniappan, Director of the IPM Innovation Lab at Virginia Tech presented on the ecological distribution of the four alien invasive weed species, Ageratina adenophora, Chromolaena odorata, Lantana camara, and Parthenium hysterophorus. He pointed out the adoption of Ageratina adenophora to humid and temperate conditions, Chromolaena odorata to humid and tropical areas, and Parthenium hysterophorus to arid and tropical situations. However, several taxa of Lantana camara found in the tropics have adopted all the three conditions mentioned above.

Dr. Wondi Mersie of Virginia State University, PI of the IPM Innovation Lab’s “Biological control of the invasive weed Parthenium hysterophorus in East Africa” project, presented a paper on the adverse effect of Parthenium hysterophorus on biodiversity of above ground vegetation and the seed soil bank of rangelands in Ethiopia.

Stephanie Parker

IPM Innovation Lab

sparker1@vt.edu

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